What is Genome Sequencing?

What is Genome Sequencing?
Simply put, genome sequencing is the first and most important part of decoding the sequence of DNA nucleotides – adenine (As), thymine (Ts), guanine (Gs), and cytosine (Cs) – in your genes. Genome sequencing gives scientists an idea of how these nucleotides are arranged in your genes, which is the first step in determining what the sequence means.  Sequencing often results in a string of As, Ts, Gs, and Cs that won’t really make any sense until they are compared to a genomic database to find out what they really mean. Still, sequencing is an important step when trying to understand an individual’s genetic makeup, which in turn can be used for many purposes, including medical diagnoses.

 

Genome Sequencing: The Journey
The first genome sequencing project – the Human Genome Project – took scientists about 15 years to uncover the complete genomic sequence of DNA from a handful of volunteers. Over the years, the project cost close to $3 billion and was successful at breaking the code and mapping genes from the samples of DNA (NIH, 2016). Since then, genome sequencing has gradually ballooned into one of the fastest growing industries in the modern world. According to a report by BCC Research, the global sequencing market was worth $5.9 billion in 2015 up from the $5.3 billion recorded in the previous year (Bergin, 2016).  The same report projects that the genome sequencing market will grow by about 18% annually between 2015 and 2020, valuing the market at $13.8 billion by 2020.  This highlights a world of opportunity for different sectors of the economy. Startups are sprouting everywhere, with many raising millions of dollars in funding for different ventures in the world of DNA sequencing.  One notable example is Phosphorous, a startup that spun out of the genomics company Recombine. In 2016, Phosphorous raised $10 million in a Series A drive that will enable the company to test couples for any signs of infertility and enable them to take preventative steps against infertility (if any) (Crook, 2016).  Genomics startup companies like Genos and Sure Genomics are placing their bets on the personal genomics space with personal home-testing kits that will let you explore your genetic code and learn about your health traits for about $499 for the Genos kit (Farr, 2016).

 

The Future of Genome Sequencing
The genome sequencing industry holds a lot of promise for companies and individuals around the globe. Apart from startups and large corporations that are currently in this space, genome sequencing will create more opportunities in allied sectors. App developers will have a field day developing solutions for those in the sector, job opportunities will crop up as government agencies look to hire additional staff to implement and regulate the industry, and personalized medicine will finally become a reality for millions of people around the world. Opportunities exist around every corner in the world of genomics. This is the perfect time for investors to dig in and watch their investments grow as the technology evolves over the next few years.  For startups, investors, and anyone looking to dig in, a good domain is one of the best places to start. A domain name like GenomeSequencing.com will give any business a globally-recognizable brand that will help take the word out to a global audience.

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